Home

REHAB CENTERS

Detox
Inpatient
Outpatient
Residential
Adolescent
Christian
12-step Alternative
Voluntary
Holistic Treatment

DRUG INFO

Club Drugs
Addiction Treatment
Dealers
Drug Free
Rehab Centers
Programs
Testing
Employee Testing
Illegal Drugs
Just Say 'No' to Drugs
Prescription Abuse
Prescription Addiction
Slogans Against Drugs
Street Prices
Street Drugs
Urine Screening
War on Drugs

ALCOHOL INFO

Addiction
Cravings
Facts
Prohibition
Recovery
Rehab Centers
Testing
Treatment Program
Withdrawal

RECOVERY STEPS

Denial in Addiction
Barriers to Change
Breaking Barriers
Recovery Process
Relapse Prevention
Symptoms of Addiction

HOW TO MAKE ...

Cocaine
Crystal Meth
Ecstasy
Heroin
LSD
Opium
PCP

HOW LONG DOES ...

Alcohol Stay in Your Body or System?
Cocaine Stay in Your System or Body?
Meth Stay in Your System or Body?

ARTICLES

Assertiveness Training
Breaking the Habit
Cocaine Effects
Cocaine Facts
Crack Cocaine
Crystal Meth Effects
Drug Alcohol Interventions
Drug Trafficking
Ecstasy Facts
Famous Addicts
Heroin Addiction
Heroin Effects
Huffing
Huffing Addiction
LSD Effects
Methamphetamines
Oxycontin Addiction
Sobriety Bracelets Patches Pills and Other Devices
Teen Drug Addiction

MORE INFO

Addiction Blog
Resources

SITE INFO

About Us
Contact Us
Privacy Policy

 

 

 

 

 

Relapse Prevention

Because relapse is a natural part of the addiction recovery process, relapse prevention plans need to be part of the overall treatment program. Planning for relapse makes good sense when over half of those who are in treatment for addiction will relapse before the end of the first year in recovery.

Relapse Prevention
Relapsing

Relapse strategies are useful so that the addict does not feel like they have failed in treatment. By planning ahead for relapse the individual knows that they are likely to occur and that they don't mean failure or even setback, but are a natural part of the recovery process.

Most relapse prevention plans call attention to possible triggers that can send a substance abuser back to their drugs of choice. In fact, the addict is encouraged to come up with a list of his or her own potential triggers that either need to be avoided or dealt with once the trigger has happened.

Triggers may be such things as going into a bar or hanging out with friends who do drugs. Triggers can also be fairly innocuous events like hearing a particular song on the radio or seeing a photo in a picture album that triggers an emotional response. The obvious triggers in relapse can be avoided, most of the time, with some ease. The not so obvious triggers must be dealt with as they occur as they can seem to come "out of the blue".

Once an addict has been triggered, they may not realize it at first. The signs of a trigger into relapse include an event, followed by some automatic thoughts, feelings and then cravings for the drugs of choice. Once the cravings have occurred, then the addict may start to have "permission thoughts" that tend to justify or rationalize that it is somehow Okay to take a drink or use drugs.


The Crisis of Relapse

Once the addict has convinced himself or herself that it's Okay to use again, some action usually follows such as the act of using the drug of choice. Prevention plans and strategies focus on derailing this sequence of events from getting from the trigger to the drug or alcohol use.

Many times the addict is not even aware the sequence has started until they have the intense cravings for the drugs or alcohol. At this point, most prevention of relapses focuses on the addict already having a plan in place for actions to take to substitute for the act of using drugs or alcohol. Exercise, meditation, yoga, eating or drinking something with caffeine or sugar, working in the garden or some other activity can refocus the craving energy into something less destructive.

In addition, substituting the permission thoughts with non-permission thoughts can also help derail the relapse progression. Thought-stopping and taking an inventory of what is to gain and what is to lose are also techniques used in preventing relapses. Another strategy is to call a friend, sponsor or therapist when the cravings or permission thoughts occur.

A therapist or drug counselor can help the addict with interpersonal skills training and communication skills in order to lessen the likelihood of relapse. For instance, a person may relapse because they are having a difficult time dealing with social pressure, interpersonal conflict or having difficulties dealing with their own negative emotions. Some addicts also slip back into denial and relapse because they wish to test their own personal control they have over the alcohol or drug use.

Addiction treatment featuring individual counseling, group counseling and outside support such as from a 12-step group, will help most addicts in their desires to prevent relapse. Once the addict has relapsed, these same resources can help the addict gain sobriety and understand how the relapse occurred and how to prevent it from occurring again in the future. For most people in addiction treatment, strategizing for relapse makes sense in the overall recovery plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


 

  COPYRIGHT 2014 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Drug Alcohol Rehab Now